Young Australians taking on the challenge of sustainable living

28 Jan 2021

A new education program developed by the Academy of Technology and Engineering (ATSE), in partnership with Orica, aims to help develop a new generation of Australian sustainability leaders. 

 

Specifically, the new module addresses sustainable housing – a critical factor for the long-term health of our planet. The module, part of ATSE’s STELR program, challenges students to consider what it takes to build a low-energy home that can withstand harsh weather conditions. As they design a low energy home, students learn how heat transfers via convection, conduction and radiation and also the thermal properties of matter.

It has been estimated that homes across Australia already produce around 13 per cent of Australia’s total greenhouse gas emissions . Improving the efficiency of these homes is important, and while good for the environment, will also allow Australians to save money on their energy bills and ensure their houses can withstand harsher weather and climate events in the future. 

“It is critical Australian students experience this hands-on style of STEM learning, so they are equipped to create a more sustainable future for generations to come,” said Orica’s Chief Financial Officer, Christopher Davis. 

“As the global population continues to grow, more importance will be placed on our own environmental impacts. Sustainable living plays a big role in helping society move towards a decarbonised future, so it’s crucial we support students as they engage and learn about this important topic." 

As a founding partner of the Science and Technology Education Leveraging Relevance (STELR) project, Orica has worked with the Academy to champion STEM learning in students, and share these resources with science classrooms all over the world.  

Most recently, Orica funded the development of STELR’s first ever remote learning module on wind turbines, allowing remote and home-schooled students throughout Australia digitally access hands-on technology and engineering education. 

“We’re a proud partner of the STELR program, and thrilled to support the development of a resource that makes STEM learning fun, interesting and meaningful for students all across the country,” Mr Davis said. 

 

This module challenges students to consider what it takes to build a low-energy home that can withstand harsh weather conditions.

As they design a low energy home, students learn how heat transfers via convection, conduction and radiation and also the thermal properties of matter. 

You can find more information on the sustainable housing module here

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